Mar 232014
 

Mother Nature has a strange sense of humor. Her creations include zombie worms and penis fish, not to mention turtles with a strange way of getting rid of urine. Read on for some of the weirdest animal discoveries ever.

1. Cannibal lemurs roam the night

You don’t have to be 40-feet long to be scary. This year, researchers studying the adorable gray mouse lemur (Microcebus murinus) in Madagascar came across a grisly scene: a male of the species feasting on the flesh of a dead female.

Although other primates (including humans) have been known to practice cannibalism, scientists had never before seen a gray mouse lemur so much as eat another mammal, according to ScienceNow, which reported the creepy meal. Scientists documented the case in the American Journal of Primatology.

2. 750-leg millipede

File this under “Things You Don’t Want to Step on With Bare Feet:” A white millipede that manages to cram 750 wiggly legs onto its 0.4- to 1.2-inch (1- to 3-centimeter)-long body.

Illacme plenipes is the world-record holder for “leggiest creature.” It’s found, bizarrely, in only a 1.7 square mile (4.5 square kilometer) area in northern California — doubly odd, because the creature’s closest living relative calls South Africa home. The millipedes may have spread out across the globe when most of the land on Earth was part of one supercontinent, Pangaea. When the supercontinent broke apart 200 million years ago, the relatives could have been separated, explaining the long-lost connection.

3. A sea predator that makes T. rex look weak

Moving on to other ancient marine wildlife, here’s a sea creature much scarier than an animal that looks like a flower. “Predator X,” a giant marine reptile that was the top predator of the seas 150 million years ago, finally got its scientific name in 2012.

Pliosaurus funkei, as it is now properly known, was 40 feet (12 meters) long with a 6.5-foot (2 m)-long skull.

“They had teeth that would have made a T. rex whimper,” study researcher Patrick Druckenmiller, a paleontologist at the University of Alaska Museum, told LiveScience.

4. tentacled snakes

How’s this for a bundle of joy? In October 2012, eight snakes with tentacles were born at the Smithsonian’s National Zoo.

It was not a Halloween prank. Zoo staff had been trying to breed the rare aquatic snake Erpeton tentaculatus for four years before success. These bizarre Southeast Asian serpents are the only snakes with two little tentacles on their snouts. These tentacles act like whiskers to help the snakes sense vibrations from swimming fish.

5. Fish with a penis head

Speaking of fish, this one has an … odd anatomy. Researchers in Vietnam’s Mekong Delta reported the discovery of a fish with a penis on its head in August 2012.

Yep, a penis. And it’s not just any penis — the organ includes a jagged hook for grabbing females during sex. (The female fish’s genitals are located on her throat.)

The species is named Phallostethus cuulong and is one of few fish that fertilizes eggs inside the female’s body rather than outside. The nasty-looking hook appendage seems to have evolved to ensure the male’s sperm get to the right place.

6.Meat-eating sponge

It looks like a harp or a delicate candelabra, but beware to any crustacean that gets too close: The so-called “harp sponge” will snare and slowly digest you before you know it.

This truly bizarre creature had never been observed by human eyes before 2000, when a team from the Monterey Bay Research Aquarium Institute in California took a remotely operated submersible into 2-mile (3.5-km)-deep waters off the central California coast. They later captured two specimens of the animal, which is scientifically called Chondrocladia lyra, and took 10 more video observations, reporting their analysis of the new species in October 2012 in the journal Invertebrate Biology.

7.Zombie worms

If you need even more proof of the horrors of the deep, consider the zombie worm, which feeds off the bones of whales and other scavenged sea creatures … despite not having a mouth. In July 2012, researchers at the Society for Experimental Biology’s annual meeting announced that they’d figured out how this mouthless creature eats bone. It excretes acid.

The acids allow the worms to break down and absorb the bone, the researchers explained. But that’s just the tip of the weirdness iceberg for these amazingly adapted worms. The females grow about an inch (3 cm) long, but males never grow larger than 1/20th of an inch (1 millimeter). They seem to live in the gelatinous tubes covering the females, serving no purpose but to fertilize her eggs.

8. Potty-mouth turtle

A sharp-snouted turtle found in China often submerges its head in puddles on dry land, a mystery given that these animals breathe air. Now, scientists say they’ve figured out why: The Chinese soft-shelled turtle (Pelodiscus sinensis) can essentially pee from its mouth.

The turtles excrete urea, the main component of urine, through the gills in their mouths, a talent previously seen only in fish, the scientists reported in October 2012 in the Journal of Experimental Biology. This may be an adaption to the turtles’ salty environment. Because they can’t get enough freshwater to wash urea out through their urine, they transport it through their gills and then rinse their urea-filled mouths out with saltwater. And you thought flossing was bad.

9. Two-headed shark fetus

This two-headed shark fetus would be right at home as a circus attraction. In March 2013, researchers reported the discovery of this odd creature in the belly of a pregnant bull shark caught off the Florida Keys.

One of the shark’s fetuses (which are live in utero in this species), had not one, but two heads. The deformity arose when the shark embryo attempted to split into twins early in development, but failed. It would not have survived long, if at all, in the wild, researchers said.

10. Snake eats monkey

Yikes! In August 2013, researchers captured on camera a boa constrictor eating a howler monkey whole.

Snake attacks on primates are rarely reported, making this video surprising. Usually, primates find protection in numbers, as they tend to live with family groups. In this particular case, the monkey wandered too far from its group and failed to see the boa. After the boa swallowed the monkey, the primate’s outline can be seen distorting its body.

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